Dantea's Baby Names











 

Name                       Origin                        Meaning

Alexandria              Greek                           “Man’s Defender” I love Alexandria. It’s my favorite feminine form of Alexander. It’s long and elegant sounding, while having a touch of the exotic too  (I’m thinking of the Alexandria Egypt right now).  All the basic nicknames still apply: Alex, Lexie, Xandra, Ria, Lia, Alia…

Augusta                    Latin                            “exalted one” It has an old fashioned kind of feel to it, but with August coming into style for the boys, I can definitely see this coming into style too. It’s got the August part in there and I prefer Auggie as a nickname for a girl for sure.

Bethany                    Hebrew                       “House of figs” I actually really like Bethany. It has a very pretty, lyrical sound with the short nickname Beth. In the bible, Bethany is the name of a village just outside Jerusalem where Jesus stayed during Holy Week.

Cecilia                       Latin                             “Blind one” The martyred Saint Cecilia was designated the patron of musicians, either because she supposedly sang directly to God while the musicians played at her wedding, or because as she was dying she sang to God. Cecilia is also a Dickens character name in Hard Times, and also appears in the novels Atonement and The Virgin Suicides, and The Hunger Games series. It sounds like an old lady too me, but it does have a pretty sound and Sissy would be a cute nickname.

Cynthiana                Greek                           “Of the moon” Cynthia is very pretty and Cynthiana is very pretty too, if a little too frilly for my taste. It has a long, flowing sound. Cynthia I suppose could be a nickname, Thia and Ana could also both work nicely.

Delphia                     Greek                           “Woman from Delphi” This name immediately made me think of Delphi, which has the oracle of Delphi, the most important oracle in ancient Greece; it was also a major site for the worship of the God Apollo. I think it’s very pretty.

Florence                  Latin                             “Flourishing, prosperous” This is another one I’ve seen thrown around a lot. I actually like Florence despite its older feel. Maybe it’s Florence and the Machine that’s given it such a boost here recently, I don’t know, but with the cute nickname Flora or Ren, I like it.

Hazel                         Color/English           English for a Hazelnut tree, and a brownish green color, it has a little of an old lady vibe, but not in a bad way.

Inez                           Portuguese                “chaste, pure, sacred”  Inez was the name of the mother of Don Juan in the Byron poem. I think it has a very cultural sound but is still very pretty.

Louisa                      Latin                             “Renowned Warrior” I like Louisa. It’s very soft and sweet sounding, but with a very neat meaning. I think the nickname Lulu is so adorable too!

Minerva                  Latin                             “Of the mind, intellect” Minerva is the long-neglected name of the Roman goddess of wisdom and invention. I prefer her Greek counterpart, Athena, but I do think Minerva would make a daring name choice and Minnie is such a cute nickname.

Myra                        Greek                             “Fragrant” I like the sound of Myra and it’s vaugely biblical as a place where Paul boarded an Alexandrian Ship that would later crash.

Olympia                  Greek                             “From Mount Olympus” This would be the perfect Olivia substitute. It’s sounds spunky and athletic, but also beautiful and goddess like. Ollie, Olive, Pia would make great nicknames.

Phyllis                     Greek                             “Green bough” Phyllis has been used by classical poets for the idealized pastoral maiden, but its twenty-first-century image is closer to Phyllis Diller. This name is all old lady too me.

Primrose                English                          “first rose” This one might start seeing a rise in popularity due to it’s connection the popular Hunger Games novels and movie. I find it interesting and cute. It has the traditional Rose and Rosie nicknames, and you could call her Prim. Be careful though, people might find this name a little too prim for their liking.

Roxana                   Persian                          “dawn: little star” The name of the wife of Alexander the Great, more attractive than the regular Roxanne. Roxana was first used in the English-speaking world in the 1600s and was popularized by Daniel Defoe’s novel Roxana, published in 1724. An underused and attractive possibility. Roxie is such a spunky nickname and Anna is nice and grounded.

Waverly                 English                           “Meadow of Quivering Aspens” Waverly has a lovely sound, and is getting more notice here lately, but I always thought it was sort of trendy. Spelled Waverley, this was the title of Sir Walter Scott’s popular 1814 novel, whose hero was a young English soldier named Edward Waverley. Spelled Waverly, it was the daughter of Buttercup and Wesley in the Princess Bride. Even though it has a lot of literary cred, I just immediately think of the TV show The Wizards of Waverly Place.

Zoe                           Greek                              “Life” Zoe is the Greek word for life, and I think that’s pretty cool. It’s getting popular nowadays and I hear it everywhere spelled in all kinds of ways, but I still think it makes a great name.



Name                        Origin                        Meaning

Artemus                    Greek                           “Gift of Artemis, Goddess of the Hunt” Artemis is a traditional female name, being the Greek Goddess of the moon and the hunt, but I always thought it sounded a bit masculine. Spelling it Artemus could make it seem more masculine. It has the Art and Artie nicknames that Arthur gives too, but Artemus is a little more unheard of.

Asher                          Hebrew                       “Fortunate, blessed, happy one” Asher is a sensitive and soft, yet strong Old Testament name. In the Bible, Asher was one of Jacob’s 12 sons. The nickname Ash is definitely a plus. It’s more edgy and strong compared to how soft Asher is.

Baxter                         English                       “baker” I think Baxter is a cool name and Bax is just as neat as Max and Jax, but I think of a dog when I hear this name. Don’t let that deter you, most people probably won’t. Singer Ian Dury named his now-grown son Baxter and Dr. Baxter Stockman was a scientist in the “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” Series

Blaine                          Irish                            “Slender, angular” Blaine is the surname of a seventh century Scottish saint but it tends to come off sounding a little soap-operaish. I, however, quite like Blaine. I think it sounds cool and adventurous, but still grounded enough to work on a grown man.

Calvin                         Latin                            “Bald, hairless” What an awful meaning! Calvin makes me think of Calvin Klein. The name came into use as a first name in honor of John Calvin–born Jean Cauvin– the seventeenth century French Protestant reformer whose strict doctrines became the basis of Calvinism, and the name was taken up as a tribute to him. There’s also Calvin Coolidge, Snoop Dog (whose birth name is Calvin), Calvin & Hobbes…

Corbin                        Latin                            “Crow” Corbin, the name of the castle where the Holy Grail was said to be hidden, came to the fore in the 1980s via actor Corbin Bernsen when he was the high profile star of LA Law, but its use is only now escalating as part of the mania for two-syllable names starting with c or k, as well as from the more youthful image of Corbin Bleu, the attractive actor-model-dancer-singer who was one of the stars of the Disney hit High School Musical. Bruce Willis played Kiorben Dallas in The Fifth Element, pronounced Corbin.

David                          Hebrew                       “Beloved” David is a classic, soft sounding name. It has deep biblical roots as the Hebrew name of the Old Testament second king of Israel who, as a boy, slew the giant Philistine Goliath with his slingshot, then grew up to become a wise and highly cultivated leader who enjoyed music and was a poet, later providing inspiration to such great sculptors as Michelangelo and Donatello.

Dexter                        Latin                            “Dyer, right handed” Dexter, with that popular X, has a lot of appeal right now. To me, Dexter is one of those names with “Geek Chic” and I really love it! Dex is a pretty cool nickname too.

Drake                          English                        “Male Duck” I love Drake. It’s simple yet cool and edgy. I’ll admit that it does sound a little soap operaish but so what? So do lots of great names. If you don’t like Drake on it’s own, there’s always a longer form like Draco.

Emerson                    German                      “son of Emery” When used as a boys name, I immediately think of Ralph Waldo Emerson. I definitely prefer this name on a boy, but be aware, it’s getting sort of popular for girls.

Garrett                       Irish                             “Spear strength” I just love Garrett. It’s one of my favorite Irish boy names. It sounds very masculine and strong, with it’s hard consonant sounds, but still friendly and approachable. Gary is a nice but old nickname if you like it, but I wouldn’t use a nickname with Garrett.

Graham                      Scottish                      “Gravelly homestead” Graham is very smooth and sophisticated. It’s been popular in the UK and Scotland for a long while now, but it’s only now starting to really climb the charts here. I love it! I will let you know though, recently I saw a post on a baby name site about the pronunciation. Seems some people pronounce it Gram (with a short a sound) and some say Gray-um. I prefer the first. The Scottish spelling, Graeme, seems like it should be pronounced gray-um though.

Grayson                     English                        “Son of the Bailiff” Grayson is getting popular right along with Jackson and other names ending in -son. I like it more than the other -son names, for sure. I prefer the spelling Greyson and the nickname Gray/Grey is nice. Be aware, some parents are using it on girls as a unisex version of Grace, but I don’t think it’s going to go far there.

Harold                        Scandinavian           “army ruler” Harold sounds like an old grandpa to me. Hal is a nice nickname I suppose, but that makes me think of 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Jeremiah                   Hebrew                       “Appointed by God” Jeremiah was an Old Testament prophet. I think of “Jeremiah was a bullfrog!” and I really dislike Jerry.

Lucas                          Greek                           “From Luciana” Lucas is getting more and more popular. Lucas has always been popular with TV writers and in literature. There’s the German Renaissance artist Lucas Cranach, Contemporary artist Lucas Samaras, or the Director George Lucas. Plus, Luke is a nice, strong and ever popular nickname.

Reed                            English                        “red-haired” I like Reed. It sounds cool and strong. Reed is a name that seems like it would bend in any direction…like a reed. I could see Reed as a banker or an artist.

Roark                          Irish                             “Illustrious and mighty” I’ve seen it described as awkward, but I really like it. It has a cool sound, but it might be hard for some people to say.

(Saint) Francis          Latin                             “Free man” Famous saints’ name pretty much confined to Irish and Italian Catholics for decades, and still has a starchy feel. Frank and Frankie are nice though.

Ulysses                      Latin                             This is a Latin variation of the Greek name Odysseus. Ulysses is one of the few U boys’ names anyone knows — with heavy links to the Homeric hero, eighteenth president Grant, and the James Joyce novel — all of which makes it both distinguished and kind of weighty for a modern boy. I love it though!

Winston                     English                         “Friend’s Town” This is one of those fusty sounding names to me. I think of Winston Churchill as soon as I hear it. Then I think of the cigarettes. However, it is John Lennon’s middle name and has the neat nickname of Win.



{May 10, 2012}   Kentucky County Names

Boys

Name                        Origin                          Meaning

Adair                          Scottish                         “Oak tree ford” I really like Adair. It has flare and spunk, but it’s not unrecognizable. I love the nickname Dare.

Allen                           Celtic                              “Handsome” It is a handsome name, but it seems a little more suited for a dad or grandpa to me. However, there are several children I work with who have Allen as their middle names, so it might be geared for a comeback.

Anderson                  Scandinavian             “Son of Anders” For reasons unknown to me, Anderson has been getting more and more popular. Maybe it’s because the the news anchor Anderson Cooper? In any case, Anderson has a bunch of literary namesake including the famous Hans Christian Anderson. It has a nice sound and the nickname Anders, which is kind of cute.

Boone                         English                          “A blessing” Boone is one of those that gives me a cowboyish feel. It makes me think of a strong, dark and handsome cowboy though. Then I think of Daniel Boone, the frontiersman.

Carlisle                       English                          “From the walled city’ This is definitely a stuffy name. I think it has a nice sound, but it’s not even on the top 1000. However, it might gain some unexpected popularity because of the character in Twilight, Carlisle Cullen.

Carter                         Occupational              “transporter of goods by cart” I like the way Carter sounds, but I mostly like that it’s presidential.

Christian                   Greek                              “Follower of Christ” Christian is a little overly pious to me, but a lot of people see it as a direct statement of their faith. I’m of the opinion that your child isn’t a personal statement about yourself, but to each their own. It’s got Chris, which is nice.

Clark                           English                           “scribe, secretary, cleric, scholar, clerk” Clark immediately makes me think of Clark Gable or Gone With the Wind Fame, and Clark Kent, Superman’s alias. It’s only in the 600s and that’s great! You could bring it back.

Clay                             English                           Clay is a short, southern charm kind of name. It could make a comeback, but I foresee it being a short from of Clayton and Clayborne for a long time yet.

Elliott                         Hebrew?                        “The Lord is my God” Love Elliott! It’s got several proper spellings and has a lot going for it. It’s uncommon but not weird either, it has literary cred, and just has a lovely sound.

Floyd                          Welsh                             “Gray haired” And does this name sound gray haired! I honestly can’t picture this name without thinking of the country; gray haired grandfather rocking on his front porch.

Franklin                     English                          “Free landowner” Frank is okay, Franklin reminds me of a green turtle from children’s cartoons and Franklin Roosevelt. The latter isn’t that bad of a name sake in my opinion.

Grant                          Scottish                         “Large” I’ve only known one Grant, and he was a little know-it-all. I find Grant to be no nonsense and strong and also with a little bit of a cowboy feel.

Grayson                    English                           “Son of the Bailiff” Grayson is getting popular right along with Jackson and other names ending in -son. I like it more than the other -son names, for sure. I prefer the spelling Greyson and the nickname Gray/Grey is nice. Be aware, some parents are using it on girls as a unisex version of Grace, but I don’t think it’s going to go far there.

Harlan                      German                           “Rocky land” It has a pleasant enough sound but all I can think of the sci-fi writer Harlan Ellison. I really dislike that writer, so it’s bad for me, but you may love him! Harley could be a cool nickname.

Henry                       German                           “estate ruler”  Henry’s been hovering the the Top 100 for a while now, but it’s getting dangerously close to being in the Top 50. Henry has an old feel, but still seems accessible.  Henry has long been a royal name.

Jackson                    English                            “Son of Jack” Jackson is getting mega popular. I’ve known several under the age of 10 and I can’t see it losing steam in the near future. The best part about this name is the nickname Jack or Jacks.

Lewis                         English                            “Renowned Warrior” This is a neat name and the phonetic spelling of the French Louis. It’s been #1 or 2 in Scotland since 2000 according to my sources, but parent’s in the USA are just noticing it. Lewis Carroll, of Alice in Wonderland fame, is probably the most famous bearer of the name here in the US. Louis Armstrong pronounced his name like Lewis. It’s got a great nickname, Lew.

Logan                        Scottish                          “Small Hollow” Logan is a Scottish surname that originated from a place of the same name in Ayrshire. It’s got a nice sound to it, but is pretty popular at #17 on the list right now. Wolverine, known as Logan, from the X-men comics and movies, gave the name a big boost too.

Martin                       Latin                                “Warlike” Very interesting meaning for such an old fashioned, geeky name. This county was named for John W. Martin, the governor when this county was named. Martin is starting to try to make a comeback, just like Arthur or Vincent or any of those other old man names. It sounds geeky, but there are several great namesakes; Martin Luther (founder of Protestantism), Martin Luther King ( civil rights activist), and eighth President Martin Van Buren.

Monroe                     Scottish                          “Mouth of the Roe river” Recently I’ve decided I like the name Monroe on a boy, probably due to an interesting character in a new TV show called Grimm. Monroe is a presidential name, but it’s starting to get popular for girls. I’d just like to say that I find this name handsome and not at all attractive for girls.

Nicholas                   Greek                               “People of Victory” Nicholas stems from the Greek Nike, the Goddess of Victory, it is a New Testament name, and also well used in literature. And then there’s St. Nicholas who, in addition to bringing bags of toys once a year, is also the patron saint of schoolchildren, mechanics, sailors, scholars, brides, bakers, travelers, and Russia, where the name was a star of the czarist dynasty. Nick is a manly nickname, Nicky is cute, and Cole is just handsome.

Owen                          Welsh                               “young warrior” Owen, a resonant Celtic name, has jumped almost three hundred places in a decade, with every indication it will go higher. It’s a classic with a genuine history, yet it’s right in step with the modern trend for two-syllable, n-ending boys’ names. I really like Owen.

Rowan                       Tree                                   The name of a tree with red berries commonly found in Scotland (and said to ward off witches).

Russell                      French                              “fox colored” Russell has some of that western sounding charm, which is nice. Russ is a good nickname, but the name is dropping in popularity as far as I’m aware.

Scott                          English                              “from Scotland” Scott is one of those short and strong names that I don’t see why it’s not more popular. I like it well enough and even work with a little boy whose middle name is Scott. Like Logan, Scott is another name from the X-Men franchise that deserves a good boost.

Spencer                    English                              “house steward, dispenser of provisions” This is a nice name, but its one of those that always feels like it won’t grow up well. I don’t know why that is, but there you go. I do like that it sounds fun and friendly though.

Todd                          English                              “Fox” I love Todd. It’s very handsome and still attractive on a child. I really wish more people would consider this one. I think it could go along with all the other strong and manly one syllable boy names.

Warren                     French                               “Park Keeper” This was on my own list at one time. Just like Truman, it’s also a presidential name. It sounds strong and handsome, old fashioned but not too old fashioned. I think Warren is ready for a come back.

Wayne                      English                               “Maker of Wagons” Because of John Wayne, this name feels like a cowboy name to me. However, it’s not one of the cool cowboy names anymore, more like a dad name.

Girls

Name                        Origin                          Meaning

Bell                              Occupational              “Ringer of the Bell” I love Bell/Belle all by itself. I like it as a nickname for Isabelle, Arabelle and other things like that, but I do love Bell by itself.

Casey                         Irish                                “Brave in battle” Casey seems like it would just fit right in with Bailey, Hayley, Kayley…I like it fine, but it’s pretty boring too.

Fayette                      French                         This is historically a shorter variation of the French Lafayette. I think it sounds very feminine though. I love the name Fay for a girl and all its variations, and I would consider this as a cute, but still sophisticated form.

Jessamine                flower                           Earlier spelling for Jasmine. Pronounced JEH-sah-meen. Popular in England but just getting it well deserved uprising here. Nickname Possibilities: Jess, Jessie, Jessa

Laurel                        Latin                            “Laurel Tree” I like Laurel a little bit. I like its connection to mythology and Greek/Roman royalty more than the name itself. It would be a good choice for anyone trying to honor a Laura in the family.

Rowan                       Tree                              The name of a tree with red berries commonly found in Scotland (and said to ward off witches). I love the nickname Row.



Names                     Origin                         Meaning

Abilene                     English                         “Grass” Abilene is a rarely used place name, mentioned as such in the New Testament, that combines the cowboy spunk of the Texas city with the Midwestern morality of the Kansas town where Dwight D. Eisenhower spent his boyhood. It’s a much less frequently heard way to get to Abby.

Alma                          Latin                             “nurturing, soul” Alma has a sort of somber sound to it, but still pretty. It’s mostly heard in the term alma mater now. It’s fairly popular in Hispanic families and could just be ready to make a comeback along with other similar names Ella, Ada, Ava…

Arcadia                     Greek                           “region offering peace and contentment” Arcadia, a name for an unspoiled paradise, makes an attractive alternative to the modern Nevaeh. I love the sound and history of Arcadia. It has a nice nickname of Cady which is so close to Catey that people won’t even blink. It can also have Ari, Aria, or Dia.

Augusta                    Latin                             “exalted one” It has an old fashioned kind of feel to it, but with August coming into style for the boys, I can definitely see this coming into style too. It’s got the August part in there and I prefer Auggie as a nickname for a girl for sure.

Aurora                      Latin                             “Dawn” Aurora, the poetic name of the Roman goddess of sunrise whose tears turned into the morning dew, and of Sleeping Beauty, would be sure to make any little girl feel like a princess. Aurora has consistently been on the popularity list since the 19th century, but is now at its highest point ever– and looks to climb even further.

Beverly                     English                         “Dweller near the beaver stream” It’s a pretty enough name, but I think of the seventies when I hear Beverly or any of it’s nicknames.

Catharine                 Greek                            “pure” It’s powerful, feminine, royal, saintly, classic, popular, adaptable. Catherine has spellings, short forms, and admirable namesakes abound. The Katherine spelling has been the preferred one in recent years, though Catherine has a gentle vintage appeal. The Katherine spelling relates to Hepburn.

Delia                           Greek                            “Born on the island of Delos” I think this name is lovely. It sounds sort of close to Delilah but could also be a short form of Adelia or Cordelia. I think it works fine on it’s own too! Delly or Lia are cute nicknames.

Eudora                      Greek                            “Generous gift” Eudora as a nice sound to it, with the cute nickname Dora or maybe Euni (you-nee). It also has a little recent attention because in Disney’s The Princess and the Frog, “Princess” Tiana’s mother was named Eudora.

Florence                   Latin                             “Flourishing, prosperous” This is another one I’ve seen thrown around a lot. I actually like Florence despite its older feel. Maybe it’s Florence and the Machine that’s given it such a boost here recently, I don’t know, but with the cute nickname Flora or Ren, I like it.

Galena                       Greek                            “Calm” Galena has a pretty sound and is a shiny silver gemstone. Galena is sometimes used in past life regression therapy as a guide to inner vision. It assists in facing and overcoming one’s deepest fears. Galena is a transformation stone. It is effective when embarking on a personal spiritual journey.

Hope                          Virtue                           I think Hope is one of those names that seems destined to always be a middle name, but I’d like to meet a Hope for a change. It’s a lovely name.

Lenexa                      Native American     This name has a really cool sound! It offers the cute nicknames Lenny, Nexi, Lexi, or Nexa.

Lenora                      English                          This used to be a modern form of Leonora but now it’s sounds just as old. I think Lenny and Nora are cute though.

Lorraine                   French                          “From the province of Lorraine” Loraine is a very old name, and it might just be ready to come back around. I like it. Lori is a nice solid nickname, but Raine is spunky.

Mayetta                    English                          This seems to be a variant of May in English, but I also found places that listed it as Egyptian to mean “beloved of Amun” I like the sound of it a lot better than just the regular May and it gives you the nickname Etta or Ettie.

Ramona                    Spanish                         “Wise protector” Ramona isn’t popular, trendy, or too out there, but personally, I think it sounds old. Mona is sort of cute though.

Rosalia                      Spanish                         This name refers back to the ancient Roman ceremony of hanging garlands of roses from tombs. I like the way Rosalia sounds and I love Rose, Rosa, Rosie, and Lia as nicknames.

Sylvia                        Latin                               “From the forest” I love Sylvia. It’s musical and reminds me of the forest. I think it has a beautiful sound and I love Sylvie as a nickname.

Victoria                    Latin                               “Victory” Victoria, the epitome of gentility and refinement, reflects the image of the long-reigning British queen. I think it sounds lovely and high-end, but Vicky and Tori make the name much more approachable.

Winona                     Sioux                              “First born daughter” I like the way Winona sounds, but the first people anyones likely to think of is Winona Ryder and Wynnona Judd. I do love Winny and Nona as nicknames!

Zenda                        Persian                           “Sacred” I really like the cool, spunky sound of this one, and the Z will make this fit in with the current trends. Zen is a cool nickname.



{May 3, 2012}   Kansas City Names — Boys

Name                        Origin                          Meaning

Albert                         English                          “Noble, bright” Albert is an old, strong name, but I don’t see it coming back very quickly. Walter is sort of like it and I’ve been seeing it around lately, so Albert might follow but the best part of Albert in my opinion is Al or Albie as a nickname.

Alden                          English                          “Old wise friend” It’s another -en name, but definitely not as stylish as Aiden or that group. I think it has potential though.

Alexander                Greek                             “Defending Warrior” Alexander is a strong and extremely popular name with tons of nicknames possibilities and variations. Alexander the Great (or Alexander III) conquered a good chunk of Asia, and is perhaps the most well known of the Alexanders. There are a ton of other great Alexanders though including Alexander Hamilton, Alexander Graham Bell, and Alexander Fleming.

Alton                          English                          “Dweller at the old town” I like it a bit, but I think it sounds and looks like Dalton with the D dropped off. I think it would be fine though.

Anthony                   Latin                               “Priceless One” Anthony is strong and classic, but it is #10, which means more than 15,000 boys had this name last year. However, that shouldn’t matter if you love it. Anthony is the patron saint of Italy and the poor. It’s also a Shakespearean name via Anthony and Cleopatra.  Tony is still just as strong as the whole name.

Arnold                       German                         “Ruler, strong as an eagle” Despite the connection to Arnold Schwarzenegger,  this name doesn’t seem to have enough muscle to get back onto the list.

Benedict                    Latin                              “Blessed” Despite the fact that all I hear is Benedict Arnold, this name has a rich history. Benedict is the name of the saint who formed the Benedictine Order and of fifteen popes. Shakespeare used the variant Benedick for a character in Much Ado About Nothing. It still gives you Ben, Benny, or Benji so that’s great!

Bentley                      English                          “Meadow with coarse grass” When I hear Bentley, all I think of is the incredibly expensive English car. Not long ago, it has a huge leap, maybe due to a teen on 16 and Pregnant who had a son named Bentley.

Clyde                          Scottish                       Bonnie and Clyde. Besides that, I sort of get a backwoods kind of vibe, but I think if I were to hear it on a kid, I might like it better.

Colby                          English                         “Coal town” I like it okay, but it seems a little childish to me, and I’ve been seeing it and hearing about it on girls recently. I prefer Cody.

Dennis                        French                        This seems to be a French form of the Greek Dionysus, but all I hear is Dennis the Menace.  Dennis is also the patron saint of France.

Dexter                        Latin                             “Dyer, right handed” Dexter, with that popular X, has a lot of appeal right now. To me, Dexter is one of those names with “Geek Chic” and I really love it! Dex is a pretty cool nickname too.

Dwight                        German/Dutch        “white/blond”  This seems really nerdy. I wish the character on the Office could make it better, but it doesn’t.

Easton                        English                        “East facing place” Easton is just a new take on Weston and at #145 it’s on it’s way up the list. I actually like Easton a little, but mostly for the nickname East.

Emmett                      Hebrew/English     “True/Universal” Emmett is definitely on the rise. It’s got a laid back feel and it’s on the rise as a male competitor for Emily and Emma. Also, Emmett is a name from the Twilight books and those names are all getting more attention right now.

Hunter                       English                        “one who hunts” Hunter is just outside the top 50 and gaining in popularity as it combines a soft sound with a masculine image. Also, occupation names are all the rage.

Lawrence                  Latin                             “From Laurentium’ This name has survived a long time, from back in ancient Roman times when Laurentium was still a city with it’s prized laurel trees. It’s sitting at the middle of the Top 1000 and has the cool nickname Law.

Leon                           Greek                            “Lion” This city is named for Juan Ponce de Leon, a Spanish explorer who named Florida. Leon is a very attractive Greek variation on Leo, and is one of many Lion-like names popular in Europe right now. I really like Leon. It’s a more serious and mature version of the name Leo.

Lewis                          English                         “Renowned Warrior” This is a neat name and the phonetic spelling of the French Louis. It’s been #1 or 2 in Scotland since 2000 according to my sources, but parent’s in the USA are just noticing it. Lewis Carroll, of Alice in Wonderland fame, is probably the most famous bearer of the name here in the US. Louis Armstrong pronounced his name like Lewis. It’s got a great nickname, Lew.

Lucas                          Greek                            “From Luciana” Lucas is getting more and more popular. Lucas has always been popular with TV writers and in literature. There’s the German Renaissance artist Lucas Cranach, Contemporary artist Lucas Samaras, or the Director George Lucas. Plus, Luke is a nice, strong and ever popular nickname.

Sawyer                       English                         “Wood cutter” Sawyer has a nice, friendly sound to it, but all I think of is Tom Sawyer, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

Seneca                        Latin/Native American          “People of the standing rock” Seneca’s distinguished heritage as the name of the ancient Roman philosopher-playwright who tutored Nero, and of an Iroquois tribe makes this an interesting choice. I think this would make a very cool middle name.

Solomon                    Hebrew                       “Peace” Wise old biblical name that, along with other patriarchal classics, is finally beginning to shed its long white beard and step from the pages of the Old Testament.

Sterling                      English                        “Of the highest quality” I love Sterling! I think it has a very cool sound and a great image to impart on your son. He’s of the highest quality.

Ulysses                      Latin                             This is a Latin variation of the Greek name Odysseus. Ulysses is one of the few U boys’ names anyone knows — with heavy links to the Homeric hero, eighteenth president Grant, and the James Joyce novel — all of which makes it both distinguished and kind of weighty for a modern boy. I love it though!

Virgil                          Latin                             “Staff bearer” The name of a Roman Poet and an early Irish saint, it’s not really heard any more. I love it. I think it would be better for a middle name though, as some people might try to say “virgin” to make fun of him.

Walker                       Occupational             “worker in cloth” I’m not really big on occupational names, but this one seems more western to me than anything. The W in George W. Bush stands for Walker. Then there’s “Walker Texas Ranger”.



{April 28, 2012}   Kansas County Names

Boys

Name                       Origin                          Meaning

Allen                          Celtic                              “Handsome” It is a handsome name, but it seems a little more suited for a dad or grandpa to me. However, there are several children I work with who have Allen as their middle names, so it might be geared for a comeback.

Anderson                 Scandinavian             “Son of Anders” For reasons unknown to me, Anderson has been getting more and more popular. Maybe it’s because the the news anchor Anderson Cooper? In any case, Anderson has a bunch of literary namesake including the famous Hans Christian Anderson. It has a nice sound and the nickname Anders, which is kind of cute.

Chase                         French                           “To hunt” Chase has a nice sound to it, and a good modern feel. It’s been seen on several TV shows here lately, including 24. It’s also megapopular in some areas of Canada and there are a disproportionate number of football players name Chase.

Clark                          English                           “scribe, secretary, cleric, scholar, clerk” Clark immediately makes me think of Clark Gable or Gone With the Wind Fame, and Clark Kent, Superman’s alias. It’s only in the 600s and that’s great! You could bring it back.

Douglas                    Scottish                          “Black water” The surname of a powerful Scottish Clan. This name seems very dated, as the only ones I know are over 40, but maybe it’ll start making a comeback. It’s sitting in the 400s now, so there does seem to be a chance.

Ellis                            Welsh                              “Benevolent” This is the Welsh form of Elijah and the Greek Elias and is fairly popular in Wales. A good note on Ellis; Ellis Bell was the male pseudonym of Emily Bronte. I like it. It has a masculine sound.

Franklin                   English                            “Free landowner” Frank is okay, Franklin reminds me of a green turtle from children’s cartoons and Franklin Roosevelt. The latter isn’t that bad of a name sake in my opinion.

Graham                    Scottish                          “Gravelly homestead” Graham is very smooth and sophisticated. It’s been popular in the UK and Scotland for a long while now, but it’s only now starting to really climb the charts here. I love it! I will let you know though, recently I saw a post on a baby name site about the pronunciation. Seems some people pronounce it Gram (with a short a sound) and some say Gray-um. I prefer the first. The Scottish spelling, Graeme, seems like it should be pronounced gray-um though.

Grant                         Scottish                          “Large” I’ve only known one Grant, and he was a little know-it-all. I find Grant to be no nonsense and strong and also with a little bit of a cowboy feel.

Gray                           Color                               Gray is my favorite color name. It’s very cool and quirky and I love it in the front or the middle. I prefer it spelled Grey though, and I also like it as a nickname for Greyson/Grayson.

Lane                           English                            “A small path” I really like Lane for a boy. It’s a recent thing, but its definitely getting attention. It makes me think of narrow country roads.

Logan                        Scottish                           “Small Hollow” Logan is a Scottish surname that originated from a place of the same name in Ayrshire. It’s got a nice sound to it, but is pretty popular at #17 on the list right now. Wolverine, known as Logan, from the X-men comics and movies, gave the name a big boost too.

Marshall                   French                             “one who looks after horses” Marshall is actually a nice name. I like the nickname Marsh. It’s the real name of rapper Eminem and then there’s Marshall from “How I Met Your Mother.” It’s in the 300s so people like it, but it’s not too popular.

Mitchell                    English                             “Who is like God?” Mitchell has gone up and down in popularity. Sometimes people like it, sometimes they don’t. Personally, I’d like to meet a little Mitchell instead of another Michael. Mitch is nice too.

Morris                       English                             “Dark-skinned” I’ve never heard this one in life, but I think it could work wonderfully. It fits nicely in with all those other surname names going around lately.

Riley                          Irish                                   “Courageous” Riley, a friendly, popular surname choice, is rising faster now for girls than boys. That makes me so sad too, because I love Riley on a boy. It makes me think of a mischievous little boy with a dimpled smile.

Russell                      French                              “fox colored” Russell has some of that western sounding charm, which is nice. Russ is a good nickname, but the name is dropping in popularity as far as I’m aware.

Scott                          English                              “from Scotland” Scott is one of those short and strong names that I don’t see why it’s not more popular. I like it well enough and even work with a little boy whose middle name is Scott. Like Logan, Scott is another name from the X-Men franchise that deserves a good boost.

Sherman                  English                              “Shearer of woolen cloth” Sherman makes me think of Sherman’s March, which isn’t a good thought, but most people probably won’t. I think Sherman’s still a little dated too, but closer to coming back than Seymour.

Thomas                    Aramaic                           “Twin” Thomas is still one of the most popular and well loved classic boys names, and a fairly common surname too. It’s the name of several saints and apostles. There’s Thomas Jefferson and Thomas Edison. Thomas came about because there were too many apostles named Judas so Jesus renamed one Thomas to distinguish him from Judas Iscariot.

Wallace                    English/French             “A Welshman/Celt” It’s so far away from being popular that it could conceivably make a comeback. Wally is adorable.

Wilson                      English                              “Son of Will” Again, a presidential name and a nice way to get to Will. I don’t think it will get past William, but it certainly could gain in popularity with William.

Girls

Name                      Origin                              Meaning

Cheyenne                Sioux                                 “People of a different language” This County was named for the Cheyenne Nation of Native Americans. The name of a courageous tribe, Cheyenne was fairly popular in the 90s. Shy is a cute nickname for this one.

Harper                      English                             “Harp player” It was “To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper (born Nelle Harper) Lee who brought this family name into the public consciousness as a female first name with offbeat, boyish southern charm, and it’s also a name with a musical bent. I really like it (but not as much as Piper).

Kiowa                        Native American         This county was named the for Kiowa Nation of Native Americans. This could make a very pretty girls name. It sounds a little like Kiona, which is a legitimate name, and that might help you if you choose it. Kia (though it’s a car) is an very cute nickname.

Lane                          English                              “A small path” I really like Lane for a boy. It’s a recent thing, but its definitely getting attention. It makes me think of narrow country roads. For a girl, I would prefer Lanay or Lanie.

 

Riley                         Irish                                   “Courageous” Riley, a friendly, popular surname choice, is rising faster now for girls than boys. That makes me so sad too, because I love Riley on a boy. It makes me think of a mischievous little boy with a dimpled smile. For a girl, I get more of a tomboy kind of image, the athletic girl.



{April 22, 2012}   Iowa City Names — Girls

Name                       Origin                        Meaning

Allison                      Scottish                       “Noble” I like Allison, but not as much as Alice (Allison is a derivative of Alice). I think the nickname Ally is nice, but the whole name feels a little boring to me.

Alta                            Latin                             “Elevated” Alta is okay. It’s one of those girls names everyone wants recently, starts and ends with A. According to some recent studies, all those A’s may help your kid get a good grade in school, so maybe this is a good bet.

Anita                         Spanish                        “Full of grace” I like Anita. It think it has a soft sort of exotic sound to it and it comes with the cute nickname Annie and the cool nickname Nita or Nina.

Aurelia                     Latin                             “Gold” I really like this one. Aurelia is a richly evocative antique name, very common in the Roman Empire but rarely heard in modern America.The name of several minor early saints, Aurelia has the right sound, feel and meaning to rise again. Aurelia was the name of the mothers of both Julius Caesar and the writer Sylvia Plath.

Charlotte                 French                         “Free man” Probably a corruption of the name of the Calusa, a group of Native Americans from the area. I love Charlotte but not enough for my own uses. I think it’s classic and pretty and has a cute, spunky nickname, Lottie.

Chelsea                     English                         “Chalk Landing Place” Chelsea is a little dated as it was it’s most popular in the early nineties. People still use it, though, as it’s still in the 200s. The best thing about it, in my opinion, is the variations in the name itself and it’s nicknames. I’d use Lea.

Clare                          Latin                             “Bright” This is the original spelling of the name Claire, but honestly, I like Claire better, and this spelling is likely to be misspelled as Claire all the time. I do like Clare/Claire though, it’s soft and sweet.

Clio                             Greek Mythology    “fame/glory” Clio is the name of the ancient Greek mythological muse of history, one that is rich with modern charm and would make an intriguing choice. I also like the spelling Cleo.

Everly                       English                         “Wild boar in woodland clearing” I sort of like Everly, but it doesn’t strike me as  a name that will age well. Ever is a cute nickname though.

Exira                          ????                               I’m not sure about this one, but I love the sound of it. I would say it ex-EER-uh but I guess it could be said eh-ZEER-uh. Either way I think it has a pretty cool sound.

Frederika                 German                       “Peaceful ruler” This would be an neat choice. It has an old fashioned formality to it, but still a pretty sound. It’s feminine but still provides boyish nicknames for those parents looking for that kind of thing. Freddy, Freda, Ricky, and Rica are nice nicknames.

Harper                      English                         “Harp player” It was “To Kill a Mockingbird” author Harper (born Nelle Harper) Lee who brought this family name into the public consciousness as a female first name with offbeat, boyish southern charm, and it’s also a name with a musical bent. I really like it (but not as much as Piper).

Imogene                  Greek                            “Beloved child” This is a variation of Imogen. Imogene is pronounced im-og-geen. Imogen is a Shakespearean name long fashionable in England, which lost its way here when spelled and pronounced im-oh-Gene. Said the British way, Imogen is as pretty and classy as it is distinctive. Imogen also gained attention through its link to Grammy-winning musician Imogen Heap.

Laurel                        Latin                            “Laurel Tree” I like Laurel a little bit. I like its connection to mythology and Greek/Roman royalty more than the name itself. It would be a good choice for anyone trying to honor a Laura in the family.

Persia                        Place name                I really like Persia, it’s very exotic and beautiful. Persia used to be the name of the country Iran. Despite — or because of — the country’s name change, still retains the brilliant coloration of an ancient Persian miniature.

Rowan                       Tree                              The name of a tree with red berries commonly found in Scotland (and said to ward off witches).

Varina                       Latin                             “Integrity” This seems to be a variation of Verena. Either spelling is nice. It has sort of an older sound, but it’s soft and lovely. I like it.

Viola                          Latin                             “Violet” I love Viola. It has a lot going for it too. It’s got the association with the musical instrument and Viola was a character in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.

Waverly                    English                        “Meadow of Quivering Aspens” Waverly has a lovely sound, and is getting more notice here lately, but I always thought it was sort of trendy. Spelled Waverley, this was the title of Sir Walter Scott’s popular 1814 novel, whose hero was a young English soldier named Edward Waverley. Spelled Waverly, it was the daughter of Buttercup and Wesley in the Princess Bride. Even though it has a lot of literary cred, I just immediately think of the TV show The Wizards of Waverly Place.



{April 22, 2012}   Iowa City Names — Boys

 

Name                      Origin                         Meaning

Alden                        English                         “Old wise friend” It’s another -en name, but definitely not as stylish as Aiden or that group. I think it has potential though.

Alexander              Greek                             “Defending Warrior” Alexander is a strong and extremely popular name with tons of nicknames possibilities and variations. Alexander the Great (or Alexander III) conquered a good chunk of Asia, and is perhaps the most well known of the Alexanders. There are a ton of other great Alexanders though including Alexander Hamilton, Alexander Graham Bell, and Alexander Fleming.

Alton                        English                          “Dweller at the old town” I like it a bit, but I think it sounds and looks like Dalton with the D dropped off. I think it would be fine though.

Andrew                   Greek                             “Strong and manly” Andrew seems to be one of the more appealing of the classic names. It has 2 popular nicknames, Andy (the fun and friendly nickname) and Drew (the grown up nickname). What I like most about Andrew is the less obvious nickname Anders, the spunky one.

Archer                     English                          “Bowman” Archer is a pretty cool name. It’s one of my favorite occupational names. It has the cute and classic nickname Archie, but in its long form, is very spunky.

Arthur                     Celtic                             “Bear” Love Arthur! I think of King Arthur, the head of the Knights of the Round Table. Arthur is also literary beyond the Arthurian Legends. It’s also in The Scarlet Letter and Poe uses it. Arthur is a great old name.

Ashton                    English                          “Ash Tree Place” I think Ashton is pretty good. Ash is a great name and it’s got that popular ending. I’ve heard that it’s been used on girls sometimes, but I think it’s distinctly masculine.

Baxter                     English                          “baker” I think Baxter is a cool name and Bax is just as neat as Max and Jax, but I think of a dog when I hear this name. Don’t let that deter you, most people probably won’t. Singer Ian Dury named his now-grown son Baxter and Dr. Baxter Stockman was a scientist in the “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” Series

Bennett                   English                          “Blessed” Bennett is a nice enough name. It give you Ben, like Benjamin, but seems a little less formal. I like it for the nickname Ben mostly.

Bernard                  German                        “Strong, brave as a bear” I really like Bernard. I think it has a sort of nerdy, intellectual sound to it, so I would out it in the Geek Chic category. Surprisingly, Bernard is the patron saint of mountain climbers. I like the nicknames Berry and Bear for it.

Brandon                 English                          “Broom covered hill” Brandon is a nice name, one I have a soft spot for but wouldn’t use myself. It had a great run in the top 10 from ’92 – ’98 but it’s slipped back down to #43 now. I don’t know why. It’s much more sophisticated than the current Braden.

Carson                     Irish/Scottish           “son of the marsh dwellers” Carson sounds a little like a businessman. It’s been in the Top 100 for a long time now but it’s at it’s highest at #80 right now. I think Carson is nice.

Chester                    Latin                             “Fortress, Walled Town” Chester is a nice enough name. it has sort of a weird, cuddly feel to it. It does have a lot of namesakes though including Admiral Chester Nimitz (a WW2 hero), Chester Gould (creator of Dick Tracy), and Chester Bennington, lead singer of Linkin Park. It has the cool nickname Chess too!

Clarence                 Latin                              “Bright” The name of the guardian angel in It’s a Wonderful Life is rarely heard the rest of the year because of its studious, near-nerdy image.

Clive                        English                           “Lives near a high hill” Clive almost has an upper class sort of sound to it, but I like it. I think of Clive Barker, the horror writer, and that takes it down out of those upper class sounds.

Conrad                    German                         “Brace counsel” I like Conrad. It sounds intellectual but still strong and manly. Conrad is a saints name and a German royal name.

Dawson                   Welsh                             “Son of David” I really like Dawson. It feels soft, but still good for a grown man. Despite the popular -son ending, I think this name makes an excellent choice.

Delmar                    Spanish                          “Of the sea” When I hear Delmar, I think of the George Clooney movie Oh Brother, Where Art Thou? It was the name of the soft hearted idiot, one of the three prisoners. I think it sounds like an old man, but the nickname Del makes it a little better.

Dexter                     Latin                                “Dyer, right handed” Dexter, with that popular X, has a lot of appeal right now. To me, Dexter is one of those names with “Geek Chic” and I really love it! Dex is a pretty cool nickname too.

Elliott                      Hebrew?                         “The Lord is my God” Love Elliott! It’s got several proper spellings and has a lot going for it. It’s uncommon but not weird either, it has literary cred, and just has a lovely sound.

Emerson                German                           “son of Emery” When used as a boys name, I immediately think of Ralph Waldo Emerson. I definitely prefer this name on a boy, but be aware, it’s getting sort of popular for girls.

George                    Greek                               “Farmer” Solid, strong, royal and saintly, yet friendly and unpretentious, George is in position for a comeback. George was the name of the king of Britain for 116 straight years, as well as the patron saint of England, Saint George, who, by slaying the dragon became the symbol of good conquering evil.

Gilbert                    German                           “Shining Pledge” Cool meaning, nerdy name. When I hear Gilbert, the first thing I think of is “What’s Eating Gilbert Grape?” However, like Alfred, Albert, Walter, and Frank, this name may be ready to try and make a comeback. It was actually a pretty common name in the middle ages in England and the name of a 12th century English saint.

Gray                        Color                                 Gray is my favorite color name. It’s very cool and quirky and I love it in the front or the middle. I prefer it spelled Grey though, and I also like it as a nickname for Greyson/Grayson.

Harlan                    German                             “Rocky land” It has a pleasant enough sound but all I can think of the sci-fi writer Harlan Ellison. I really dislike that writer, so it’s bad for me, but you may love him! Harley could be a cool nickname.

Harris                     English                              “Son of Harry” Harris is nice. I think it has a manish sound but it isn’t over the top. It isn’t too surnamey like Harrison but it’s newer than Harry.

Harvey                   French                              “Battle Worthy’ Love the meaning but the name is a little immature to me.  Makes me think of Sabrina the Teenage Witch and the bumbling boy she has a crush on. Actually though, this name is getting fairly popular in England. It’s in the top 50 over there. It also has some worthy namesakes too. There’s the blind 6th century saint who was said to be a monk and minstrel able to talk to animals. There was the industrialist Harvey Firestone. There’s a lot of history here. Maybe I’m wrong?

Huxley                   English                              “Inhospitable place” I actually really like Huxley. Hux is such a cool nickname, and Huck is pretty cute. When I hear Huxley, I think of author Aldous Huxley, author of Brave New World, which is great!

 

Irwin                       English                              “Boar Friend” It’s okay, but it mostly reminds me of the late Steve Irwin, the Australian who was very fond of poking dangerous animals with sticks. Might be a nice name for a boy you hope to be adventurous, but it does have a nerdy sort of feel.

Leland                    English                               “Meadow land” I think Leland is okay, but the one person I’ve met with this name didn’t wear it well. I think it would make a great middle name, and Lee or Leo are good nicknames.

Leon                        Greek                                  “Lion” This county is named for Juan Ponce de Leon, a Spanish explorer who named Florida. Leon is a very attractive Greek variation on Leo, and is one of many Lion-like names popular in Europe right now. I really like Leon. It’s a more serious and mature version of the name Leo.

Lewis                       English                               “Renowned Warrior” This is a neat name and the phonetic spelling of the French Louis. It’s been #1 or 2 in Scotland since 2000 according to my sources, but parent’s in the USA are just noticing it. Lewis Carroll, of Alice in Wonderland fame, is probably the most famous bearer of the name here in the US. Louis Armstrong pronounced his name like Lewis. It’s got a great nickname, Lew.

Logan                      Scottish                              “Small Hollow” Logan is a Scottish surname that originated from a place of the same name in Ayrshire. It’s got a nice sound to it, but is pretty popular at #17 on the list right now. Wolverine, known as Logan, from the X-men comics and movies, gave the name a big boost too.

Luther                     German                              “Army people” I really like Luther. It’s very cool and calm sounding. When I hear it, I first think of Lex Luther then I think of Martin Luther King.

Marcus                    Latin                                   “Warlike” Marcus is one of those Ancient Roman names that is coming back into popularity (along with other -us ending Roman names like Cassius). Marcus was a pretty commonplace name in ancient Rome, and among the most prominent were the emperor and stoic philosopher Marcus Aurelius, the Marcus known to us as Mark Antony, and the politician, philosopher and orator Cicero.

Maxwell                  Scottish                             “Great stream” Maxwell might be my favorite Max name. It’s not as pretentious as Maximillion or as feminine sounding as Maxence. Max is a cool nickname too. Lance Armstrong just chose it for his son and it makes me think of the Beatle’s song Maxwell’s Silver Hammer.

Miles                        Latin                                   “merciful” I like Miles, it has a cool, jazzy (think Miles Davis) sort of sound. Miles was the name of the first translator of the Bible into English–the English monk Miles Coverdale.

Milo                          Latin                                   “mild, peaceful, calm” I love Milo. It’s so bouncy and fun sounding, but I can still picture it on a grown man. The only downside that I can see is that some people might think of the Milo and Ottis kids movie.

Percival                  French                               “One who pierces the valley” Percival was the one perfectly pure Knightof the Round Table, a worthy hero. The name was invented in the twelfth century by a poet named Chretien de Troyes, for his ideal knight in the poem “Percevale, a Knight of King Arthur.” I think Percival has a sort of stuck up sound to it, but I still really like it, and Percy makes it so friendly.

Quimby                   Norse                                 “From the woman’s estate” Virtually never heard in this country — and probably not very often in Scandinavia — with a quirky quality. I sort of like it, but it makes me think of a butler for some reason.

Randall                    English                              “Shield wolf” This is an old name, but I don’t really like it. It sounds very hillbilly to me. I like other Ran- names better, but at least Randy is still a cute nickname.

Roland                     German                             “Famous throughout the land” I really like Roland. It has a chivalrous and knightly sound to it for me, and Rollo is such a cute nickname.

Rowley                    English                               “Rough clearing” I would say this like ROW-lee (the Ow like in “OW I hurt myself” or Now) but other would probably pronounce it like ROW-lee (as in Row your boat). I think it’s very cool.

Russell                     French                               “fox colored” Russell has some of that western sounding charm, which is nice. Russ is a good nickname, but the name is dropping in popularity as far as I’m aware.

Ryan                         Irish                                    “Little King” Ryan has been one of the ever popular Irish names in America. It has always sort of stayed in the top 20 or near it. I think it’s a fine, classic name.

Sheldon                   English                               “Steep sided valley” I like Sheldon, but only because of Dr. Sheldon Cooper from The Big Bang Theory. It’s definitely a nerdy name, but I still like it.

Spencer                   English                               “house steward, dispenser of provisions” This is a nice name, but its one of those that always feels like it won’t grow up well. I don’t know why that is, but there you go. I do like that it sounds fun and friendly though.

Stanley                    English                               “Near the stoney meadow” Stanley really seems nerdy to me. I don’t think it’s ready for “Geek Chic” yet, but it would be a great middle name.

Stuart                       Scottish                             “Steward” This is an ancient Scottish royal name. I like it, but I also immediately think of Stuart Little, the tiny mouse.

Thor                          Norse                                 “thunder” I love this! Thor is the powerful name of the Norse god of thunder, strength, and rain, the son of Odin, and it would make a bold statement. Thor was in Marvel Comics and has recently been made into a movie. Thor Heyerdahl was a famous Norwegian anthropologist/adventurer, author of the book Kon Tiki.

Victor                       Latin                                  “Conqueror” Victor is one of the earliest names of Christian Popes and Saints. It became popular in the English speaking world via Queen Victoria since Victor was the only masculine form of Victoria.

Vincent                    Latin                                  “Conqueror” Vincent was popular during the Middle Ages, especially among the French, who brought it to England. There are a number of St. Vincents, most famous of whom is St. Vincent de Paul, a seventeenth century French priest who organized societies of laymen to help the poor. There’s Vincent Van Gogh and actor Vince Vaughn. Vince is a strong nickname and Vinny is cute.

Walker                      Occupational                  “worker in cloth” I’m not really big on occupational names, but this one seems more western to me than anything. The W in George W. Bush stands for Walker. Then there’s “Walker Texas Ranger”.



{April 17, 2012}   Iowa County Names

Boy

Name                       Origin                        Meaning

Adair                         Scottish                       “Oak tree ford” I really like Adair. It has flare and spunk, but it’s not unrecognizable. I love the nickname Dare.

Boone                        English                        “A blessing” Boone is one of those that gives me a cowboyish feel. It makes me think of a strong, dark and handsome cowboy though. Then I think of Daniel Boone, the frontiersman.

Clarke                        English                        “Scribe,scholar” Clarke has been out of popularity for a while now, but it’s starting to get more and more popular with parent’s seeking a short, strong name. Variation is Clark.

Davis                          Hebrew                       “beloved” Davis is a really nice twist on the traditional David. I actually like the surname better, and I usually don’t. Davis feels a little more edgy than David, but you still get the old nickname Dave.

Emmett                     Hebrew/English     “True/Universal” Emmett is definitely on the rise. It’s got a laid back feel and it’s on the rise as a male competitor for Emily and Emma. Also, Emmett is a name from the Twilight books and those names are all getting more attention right now.

Floyd                         Welsh                           “Gray haired” And does this name sound gray haired! I honestly can’t picture this name without thinking of the country; gray haired grandfather rocking on his front porch.

Harrison                   English                        “Son of Harry” It’s another surname name made popular by Harrison Ford. It’s perfect for parent’s looking for an H name that’s not the tired Harry or Hank, but isn’t too much like Huntington. It also has the cute nn of Harris.

Henry                        German                       “estate ruler”  Henry’s been hovering the the Top 100 for a while now, but it’s getting dangerously close to being in the Top 50. Henry has an old feel, but still seems accessible.  Henry has long been a royal name.

Howard                     German                       “brave heart” This is a cool meaning, old name. Howie and Ward make it much more accessible though.  Howard is getting dangerously close to falling off the top 1000, and that’s just wrong. I think Howard is a nice, solid name, and the only one I’ve known was a genius who could do advanced math in his head…it’s a good image!

Jasper                       Persian                         “bringer of treasure” Distinct and masculine, Jasper is a type of Quartz, and is one of the only gem names for boys. The only real problem with it is it’s strong connection to Twilight. Because of that, it might get very popular. Jasper was also thought to be the name of one of the 3 wise men.

Lucas                         Greek                            “From Luciana” Lucas is getting more and more popular. Lucas has always been popular with TV writers and in literature. There’s the German Renaissance artist Lucas Cranach, Contemporary artist Lucas Samaras, or the Director George Lucas. Plus, Luke is a nice, strong and ever popular nickname.

Marshall                   French                         “one who looks after horses” Marshall is actually a nice name. I like the nickname Marsh. It’s the real name of rapper Eminem and then there’s Marshall from “How I Met Your Mother.” It’s in the 300s so people like it, but it’s not too popular.

Mitchell                    English                         “Who is like God?” Mitchell has gone up and down in popularity. Sometimes people like it, sometimes they don’t. Personally, I’d like to meet a little Mitchell instead of another Michael. Mitch is nice too.

Monroe                     Scottish                       “Mouth of the Roe river” Recently I’ve decided I like the name Monroe on a boy, probably due to an interesting character in a new TV show called Grimm. Monroe is a presidential name, but it’s starting to get popular for girls. I’d just like to say that I find this name handsome and not at all attractive for girls.

Scott                          English                         “from Scotland” Scott is one of those short and strong names that I don’t see why it’s not more popular. I like it well enough and even work with a little boy whose middle name is Scott. Like Logan, Scott is another name from the X-Men franchise that deserves a good boost.

Warren                     French                         “Park Keeper” This was on my own list at one time. Just like Truman, it’s also a presidential name. It sounds strong and handsome, old fashioned but not too old fashioned. I think Warren is ready for a come back.

Wayne                      English                         “Maker of Wagons” Because of John Wayne, this name feels like a cowboy name to me. However, it’s not one of the cool cowboy names anymore, more like a dad name.

Girls

Name                      Origin                       Meaning

Fayette                    French                         This is historically a shorter variation of the French Lafayette. I think it sounds very feminine though. I love the name Fay for a girl and all its variations, and I would consider this as a cute, but still sophisticated form.

Ida                             German                       “Industrious one” Other short vowel names are coming back — Ada, Eva, Ava — but Ida still sounds sort of old ladyish, but that’s not too bad.

Louisa                      Latin                             “Renowned Warrior” I like Louisa. It’s very soft and sweet sounding, but with a very neat meaning. I think the nickname Lulu is so adorable too!

Madison                  English                        “son of Maud” Historically a boy name and extremely popular, #8, for girls. I don’t like this name too much, but I understand that most parent’s like it for it’s upscale kind of feel, or as a way to get to Maddy.

Page                          French/Word          “Page, attendant” or a piece of paper. I really like the connection the books and whatnot, but it’s also usable because of the same sound it has to Paige.

Shelby                      English                       “Estate on the ledge” Shelby was trendy 10 years ago, but it’s fallen out of favor for other -y names like Kelby, Bailey, Hailey, Kayley…. I can’t see why it might not get used too.

Story                         Word                          Very cute. I don’t think it would work very well as first name but as a middle it’s awesome! It’s absolutely perfect for the child of a writer.



{April 8, 2012}   Indiana City Names — Girls

Name                        Origin                       Meaning

Alexandria               Greek                          “Man’s Defender” I love Alexandria. It’s my favorite feminine form of Alexander. It’s long and elegant sounding, while having a touch of the exotic too  (I’m thinking of the Alexandria Egypt right now).  All the basic nicknames still apply: Alex, Lexie, Xandra, Ria, Lia, Alia…

Arcadia                     Greek                           “region offering peace and contentment” Arcadia, a name for an unspoiled paradise, makes an attractive alternative to the modern Nevaeh. I love the sound and history of Arcadia. It has a nice nickname of Cady which is so close to Catey that people won’t even blink. It can also have Ari, Aria, or Dia.

Ashley                       English                        “dweller near the ash tree meadow” Ashley was mega-popular in the 80s and 90s but now it’s starting to go back down while still managing to stay in the top 30. It’s pretty but I like the nickname Asha much more.

Brook                        Nature                         This is an alternate spelling to Brooke. Personally, I think the E at the end makes it look more complete. Brook is nice, if a little dated, but I think it’s a sweet name.

Celestine                  Latin                            “Heavenly” This is a very pretty name! I’ve never really liked Celeste, so this just makes it so much better. I suppose you could use Celeste as a nickname.

Cynthiana                Greek                          “Of the moon” Cynthia is very pretty and Cynthiana is very pretty too, if a little too frilly for my taste. It has a long, flowing sound. Cynthia I suppose could be a nickname, Thia and Ana could also both work nicely.

Dana                           English                       “From Denmark” This name found in both Celtic and Scandinavian mythology has gone from all-boy to almost all-girl. I can’t even begin to picture this on a boy. It does have a slightly older sound to it though, as Dana is my grandmother. This is also the birth name of Queen Latifah.

Elizabeth                  Hebrew                      “Pledged to God” Elizabeth is popular, has always been popular, and will always be popular. Elizabeth has a rich history as a name for queens and therefore, a timeless sort of style. Elizabeth has a ton of nickname possibility: Liz, Lizzy, Beth, Eliza, Libby, Bess, Ellie, Liza

Flora                         Latin                            “Flower” Flora, the Roman Goddess of Flowers and Spring, who enjoyed eternal youth, is one of the gently old-fashioned girls’ flower names that’s due for a comeback. It’s been popular in Scotland for a long time, but isn’t too popular here. I think it’s very soft and pretty and I would love to see it get more use.

Florence                  Latin                            “Flourishing, prosperous” This is another one I’ve seen thrown around a lot. I actually like Florence despite its older feel. Maybe it’s Florence and the Machine that’s given it such a boost here recently, I don’t know, but with the cute nickname Flora or Ren, I like it.

Hanna                        Hebrew                      “Grace” I know someone who recently used this spelling to honor an Anna. I also teach a Hanna spelled this way. I like it both ways, with the H and without. It’s a lovely name with a lovely sound.

Laurel                       Latin                            “Laurel Tree” I like Laurel a little bit. I like its connection to mythology and Greek/Roman royalty more than the name itself. It would be a good choice for anyone trying to honor a Laura in the family.

Lynn                         Welsh                           “Lake” I like Lynn but I definitely feel like it’s a name dated to the 70s or 80s. My mother’s middle name is Lynn and a lot of other women I’ve met her age have the middle name Lynn. I do like it though, and think it could still make a very nice middle name, but only middle as it feels incomplete in the first. Longer forms like Linnea would make a nice first name to use Lynn as a nickname.

Macy                         English                        “Hill” I like it, but it just feels like a nickname to me. It doesn’t feel like it will age well. This spelling makes me think of the store. I teach 2 Macy’s with the spellings Maci and Mace (although that last one looks like Mace as in the medieval weapon to me).

(Saint) Bernice      Greek                           “She who brings victory” I only sort of like Bernice. It’s pretty but I don’t really like the sound of it. The nickname Berry would be cute, but that’s all I really like about it.

 



et cetera